About

Armstrong-Johnston is the collaboration of museum and archives professionals
Leigh Moran Armstrong and Mindy Spitzer Johnston, who share a love of history, visual
culture, and a commitment to making archival resources available to the wider public.

Leigh Moran Armstrong

Leigh Moran Armstrong
Leigh began her career in visual materials archives at the Chicago History Museum, where she worked as an Imaging Specialist and as the Collection Manager for the museum's extensive prints and photographs collection from 1999-2007. At CHM, Armstrong appraised and acquired historically significant collections, negotiated terms of use with donors, directed volunteer and grant-funded staff on processing projects, curated exhibitions, and worked collaboratively on publications. Before launching Armstrong-Johnston in 2010, she worked on a freelance basis processing private photographic archives and conducting historic picture research on behalf of publishers, designers, and production companies. She is a member of the Academy of Certified Archivists.

Armstrong holds a Master's degree in Art History from the University of Illinois at Chicago, has taught the history of photography at Columbia College, and lectured on topics related to the archival administration of historic photograph collections. She also teaches Basics of Materials: Photography, at the Graham School of General Studies, University of Chicago.

Mindy Spitzer Johnston

Mindy Spitzer Johnston
Mindy has spent much of her career at the Chicago History Museum and the Harvard Law School Library. From 1999-2006, Johnston held many positions at CHM including project editor of the Haymarket Affair Digital Collection, project archivist for the American Experience documentary Chicago: The City of the Century, and assistant curator for the exhibition Chicago: Crossroads of America. Johnston became the Law School's Curator of Digital and Visual Resources in 2006.  There she managed digital projects and curated the Library's collection of painted portraits, prints, photographs, and objects. From 2009-2010, she served as the Library’s Digital Projects Consultant. Johnston has extensive experience in selecting, cataloging, and interpreting two- and three-dimensional artifacts and approaches archival work from the perspective of a researcher, historian, and curator.

Johnston holds a Master's degree in American History from DePaul University and a Bachelor's degree in American History from Northwestern University. In April 2011, she was appointed to the Illinois Historical Preservation Agency’s Board of Trustees.